Where did I park? Ask my car!

The arrival of the autonomous car is getting closer and closer. The key players in the race, Google, Ford, GM have recently and dramatically stepped up their game, each having their own vision and ambitions as to what driver-less cities will look like. Each working more diligently to get to that future state sooner than later.

In the coming months and years, we are going to see the trend of car ownership as a right of passage start to reverse. Cars are going to be viewed now as more of a single piece of the overall mobility ecosystem. On-demand access, in place of ownership will become more the defacto approach for those thinking about transportation options.

The statistics don’t lie. Surveys are showing that younger generations are much less likely to own a car and monthly sales data for car sales are slowing across all major brands.

Enter the self driving car and the factor for change starts to increase even more. Why? Mostly because as the naming clearly points out, self driving cars are autonomous. This means they can both drive and park themselves.

With cars now being able to think for themselves, where they are located now becomes less relevant in their need or use. If I want to share a car it can be summoned. Meaning it does not have to be close by for a person to utilize. This also works on the other end of a trip. The car that takes you doesn’t have to wait around sitting in an expensive parking lot until your ready for your next trip.

This opens up even more opportunity for car sharing support services such as shared parking apps, like Rover Parking out of Toronto. http://roverparking.com.  These AirBnB of parking type services allow for cars to be parked, most likely in shared, private driveway spaces, rather than parking lots, sitting waiting all over a city or community. Making the likelihood of the car sharing model that much more feasible.

So you want to know where “my car” is parked. Soon enough, your going to have to ask the car not the driver.